05/25/2016

Terminology

Terminology

blackjack-1228459

 


Boxing:

Boxing, in Table Games, does not mean a fight in the ring, although there are times where dealers would secretly love nothing more than to knock a “challenging” player out.
boxing in our world means to take a portion, usually a third, of the deck from the bottom and place it back on top of the deck. This method and “stripping” are often used in conjunction with shuffle procedures.
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Dual Rate
A Dual-Rate Supervisor is basically a supervisor in training. When a dealer becomes a Dual-Rate, he or she stands as a Floor Supervisor some days and others he or she deals. When on the floor as a Supervisor, they perform all the tasks a Floor Supervisor does which includes, but is not limited to, correcting mistakes, issuing markers, changing cards and other tasks. They, just as a full-time supervisor, are assigned to watch anywhere from two games to eight or nine games. The next step for a Dual-Rate is a Floor Supervisor. Depending on the casino, dealers almost always make more than the supervisors, whether Dual-Rate, or not. Dealers get tips, supervisors don’t. A Dual-Rate gets tips on days they deal, but on days they are on the floor, they get a salary rate. Don’t make the mistake of calling a Floor Supervisor, or Shift Manager a “Pit Boss”. Pit bosses are from around 20 years ago.
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Jackpot:
A jackpot, by a player’s definition, is winning a large amount of money, or the highest payout offered for that game or machine.
A dealer once went to a game the supervisor assigned her to. It was a dead table so she thought she could skate. A player came and the dealer told the supervisor that she didn’t know how to deal the game.
I was at a dead table myself and know how to deal the game that that particular dealer didn’t. That didn’t go over very well. A supervisor had to tap me out to go over to the game while the dealer on that game had to take my place.
Anyone, in any job can be terminated for not being able to properly do their jobs. Putting ourselves in a situation, such as the one above, that can get us terminated and/or written up is what we call a jackpot. Supervisors and managers always tell us never to do that. if we don’t know a game we’re asked to go to, tell them. They can assign us to a different game so I’ll never understand why anyone would put themselves in a jackpot situation.
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Dirty Rack:
One of my biggest pet peeves is going to a game with a rack that is completely disorganized, meaning that the checks are not in stacks of 20, or that the colors are not separated properly. Any of the above makes it difficult fora dealer, or a supervisor to read and/or count the rack.Another thing that is frustrating is a Dirty Stack, which means an odd color in a stack. I.E., if there is a stack of 20 green checks, but a red one in the middle.
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Dropcut:

As a dealer, we have to know how to handle checks. A couple of techniques we use are drop cutting and sizing into checks. Below is a video link that teaches these techniques.When we pay someone at the table, we usually, not always, size into their bet, meaning we take a stack of checks, place them against the player’s bet, then withdraw the checks that are higher than the player’s bet by sliding our fingers across the player’s bet, thus taking the excess checks away and leaving the correct amount.Craps dealers have to be very skilled at handling checks. They drop cut checks many times which means taking a stack of checks and dropping any number of checks from the stack on the table. for example, if I needed five checks, I would take a stack in one hand. Using the index finger of the hand with which I was holding the checks, I would hold the sixth check from the bottom and let the bottom five drop.
It takes quite a bit of practice with checks to get good enough to do that without looking at the bottom of the stack and see where five checks is.
Most dealers, myself included, can take a large stack of checks and pull off 20 just by the feel.
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Walk Your Game:
Game protection is of the utmost importance for obvious reasons. At least, I hope they’re obvious.Walking our game involves dealers moving left and right as we deal each hand, allowing us to keep an eye on the whole table as we deal. If we don’t, we can lose sight of first and third base(1st person at the table to the dealer’s left and last person to the dealer’s right.) and risk having them past-post, meaning add money onto their original bet which is illegal and people can, and do go to jail for it.
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Stripping:
Keep it clean! Take your mind out of the gutter here– it has nothing to do with anyone taking clothes off– at least not in this context.
In Table Games, stripping means stripping a deck, or taking a small pile of cards from the top of the deck, setting it on the table, then taking a small portion from the bottom of the deck and placing that on top of the previous pile. Many shuffle procedures, whether it’s a double or single deck, six or eight-deck shoe, incorporate stripping.
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Rubber Band:
Normally, dealers are assigned to one game that they will deal their whole shift, unless they are a relief dealer.
The dealer will generally spend an hour at a table and then take a 20-minute break.
In a “rubber band”, dealers are not assigned to any one game. They are assigned to different games depending on which dealer(s) is due for a break.
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Going Blind:
This has nothing to do with a person’s vision.
In casino terms it does mean a player stays on their hand without looking at the cards. For example, in Three-Card Poker a player would put their play bet down and play the cards without looking at them as opposed to looking at them and having the option to fold.
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First Base:
The “bases” in casino terminology do have somewhat of a baseball reference.
First base refers to the first player to receive cards at a table.
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Third Base:
The “bases” in casino terminology do have somewhat of a baseball reference.
Third base refers to the last player, not the dealer, to receive cards at a table.
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Mucking:
Mucking can mean two things. One: picking up chips or checks from the table, or two: folding your hand.
Third base refers to the last player, not the dealer, to receive cards at a table.
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Bust:
This is not a body part. In blackjack, when anyone, whether it’s a player, or dealer, goes over 21, it’s called a “bust” If a player busts, they lose. If the dealer busts, all players left in the hand win.
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